Walter Takes in Hungry 10-Year-Old Runaway

This article was published on June 25, 1934, in the midst of the Great Depression.  I can only imagine what it was like for these girls living on the streets for a week.

1934-06-25-10-year-old-girl-odyssey-ends-alice-shields

10-Year-Old Girl’s Odyssey Ends When Ridgefield Cop Offers Good Home, Food

A 10-year old New York girl, who with her 13-year-old sister ran away from their New York home because their mother had too many mouths to feed, is going to know the feeling of having a good home with plenty to eat for a few weeks at least.

The girl, Betty Shields, has been taken in by Sergeant and Mrs. Walter Gallagher of Ridgefield, for a few weeks stay.  She and her sister Alice were picked up in Ridgefield Saturday, while they sat on a curb forlornly awaiting a bus to take them back to their home on Old Broadway, New York.

The sisters told Patrolman Joseph Sucek who brought them to the Ridgefield station, that they had been wandering about New Jersey since last Monday.  They slept for the most part, they said, on open porches and in vacant houses.

They didn’t mind particularly that they hadn’t eaten for a couple of days, for they weren’t used to getting much at their own home.  There are four other brothers and sisters, and with their father out of work, they felt they were making the burden heavier for their parents.

The girls were befriended by a 17-year-old Little Ferry boy, Friday, who took them to his brother-in-law’s home and fed them and then “staked” them to their fare back home.

Tired of wandering about in strange towns, and hungry, too weak to stand in the hot sun while they awaited the bus, Betty and Alice parked their weary bodies on the curb stone, where Patrolman Sucek found them.

They were taken to the station where they related a tale of privation and poverty in their New York home.  Sergeant Gallagher offered to take Betty home with him and his wife for a few weeks.

The mother of the girls came to Ridgefield later in the day, after being notified by the New York police of the whereabouts of the youngsters.  She told police that both Betty and Alice felt very badly because things were so hard for their parents at home.

Mrs. Shields consented to Sergeant Gallagher’s suggestion, and now Betty’s going to have plenty to eat and a good home for a while.  Alice was taken back to New York by her mother.

Billy Gallagher’s Funeral – Part 2

The New York Sun published this article about Billy’s funeral on March 7, 1934; p. 14, col. 1; I never really understood how “well-connected” Billy was until I read this article.  It’s not every day you find a write-up about an ancestor’s funeral where so many public officials and celebrities attended.

1934-03-07-throng-at-mass-for-gallagher-p1-1THRONG AT MASS FOR GALLAGHER

Saloon Keeper Has Real Broadway Funeral

OLD FRIENDS ARE IN TEARS

Show World Well Represented at St. Malachy’s Church.

They buried Billy Gallagher today from St. Malachy’s Church in West Forty-ninth street, from the vicinity in which he had spent his life.  He first broke into Broadway as a caterer to the thirsts of that thoroughfare at the northwest corner of Forty-seventh street some thirty-five years ago and during the last fifteen years he lived he conducted a cabaret at 717 Seventh avenue.

It was such a funeral as Billy Gallagher would have desired – a Broadway funeral.  St. Malachy’s, the “actors church,” was the ideal setting for it.  And the services concluded as Billy Gallagher would have had them conclude, with a burst of sunshine illuminating his onyx coffin, while Joe White, the radio singer, known as “The Silver Mask Tenor,” sang a touching farewell and the temperamental mourners sobbed aloud in chorus.

More than any other saloon keeper, Billy Gallagher formed a direct link with the Broadway at the close of the last century.  Jim Churchill, who used to be his competitor, is dead; George Rector has retired. Mike Dowling, whose place at Forty-third street and Seventh avenue was open twenty-four hours a day for years is dead. The Considine boys and Paddy Roche who used to irrigate the south side of Forty-second street at Broadway are dead.  About the only one of Billy Gallagher’s old rivals of a quarter of a century ago who is alive is Tom O’Rourke and The Sun reporter did not see him at the funeral services.

1934-03-07-throng-at-mass-for-gallagher-p1-2-ny-sun-col-1Old Timers Attend

Everybody else who should have been there was there: From the theater came actors, actresses and managers, bill posters and stage hands, advance agents and musicians, all former customers of Billy’s and many of them with memories of the generosity of the old time saloon keeper who never turned down anybody with a hard luck story.

From the night clubs came performers and managers, waiters and headwaiters and here and there in the church could be seen shabby old men who were young “singing waiters” when Billy Gallagher introduced that type of entertainment to what was then Longacre Square.1

All the scrubwomen who were employed by Gallagher to clean up his place every morning were at the funeral and al [sic] wept unceasingly because in Billy Galagher [sic] they lost not only a good employer but a god [sic] friend.  All the members of orchestra and his floor show company were there, wiping tears out of red-rimmed eyes, for few had ben [sic] to bed last night.

Gallagher’s old performers, in years so long that nobody wanted to try to remember them, mingled with the chorus girls who were employed by him at the time of his death.

Jack Sheerin, doorman of Gallagher’s Cabaret, who contributed a blod [sic] transfusion in an effort to save his employer’s life, was a sort of unofficial floor manager and usher, seeing that all the old friends had prominent places in the center aisle.

The Rev. Edward F. Leonard, pastor of St. Malachy’s, sang a requiem high mass.  The Rev. Joseph McKenna and the Rev. Patrick A. Gallagher, his assistants, acted as deacon and sub deacon respectively.  A mixed quartet under the direction of the organist, Joseph Davis, chanted the responses and Joe White rendered solos before and after the mass.

One of the principal mourners was Laura, who has been the hat check girl in Gallagher’s cabaret ever since it opened.  Another who was profoundly grief-stricken was Joe Callahan, formerly a manager for Gallagher and always one of his closest friends.

1934-03-07-throng-at-mass-for-gallagher-p2Sheriff Finn Is Mourner

Others who attended the services were Sheriff Dan Finn, Jay Finn, deputy clerk of the Board of City Magistrates Court; General Sessions Judges George L. Donnellan and Owen Bohan ex-Senator Harry Doll, who succeeded Big Tim Sullivan; Deputy Chief Clerk of the City Court Charles A. Hussey and Mrs. Hussey, Alderman John Mahoney; ex-Alderman John W. McCann, Charles A. Harnett, State Commissioner of Motor Licenses, and Mrs. Harnett; James Thornton, Charles Connington, head waiter in Gallagher’s cabaret; Dick Pritchard, Gertrude Dwyer, Fred McCloy, former manager of the Columbia Burlesque Theater; Herman Beyer, the Republican leader of the Fifth Assembly district; former State Senator Elmer Quinn, Patrick H. Bird, Frank J. Clausman, Kid Broad, the former pugilist; Billy Murphy, Billy and James Fogarty, George W. Pease, Billy Arnold, Joseph W. Falvey, John J. Nevins and Mrs. Nevins Ben Levy, Michael Kennedy, former Detective Mike Quinn, John O’Connor and Tess Dardell.

Mr. Gallagher died last Sunday in the Medical Arts Sanitarium of diabetes, with which he had been a sufferer for years.  At the conclusion of the funeral services the body was taken to the Pennsylvania Station, where it was put aboard a train for Camden, N. J., Mr. Gallagher’s birthplace, where it will be interred.  It was accompanied to Camden by his brother, John Gallagher, and his three sons, Joseph, Walter P. and Bernard Gallagher.

 

  1. Longacre Square was renamed by Mayor George McClellan in 1904 when the New York Times relocated there. See this article.

Billy Gallagher’s Funeral – Part 1

Once again, someone forgot to mention to the newspaper folks that Billy had been married twice more.  This unidentified article announced the funeral, mass, and burial.

1934-03-06-funeral-notice-billy-gallagher-no-date

GALLAGHER — On March 4, 1934, William J., beloved husband of the late Mary, and devoted father of Joseph M., Bernard J., Walter J., and brother of Joseph M., Emma, Frances and Lillian[.]  Funeral from his late residence, 34-51 75th St., Jackson Heights, L. I., Wednesday, 9 A. M. Solemn Requiem Mass St. Malachy’s Church, 10 A. M.  Interment Camden, N. J.


Another announcement from another unidentified newspaper. Whether he had a ton of money or not (but seriously, not), he was certainly popular.

LEADERS ATTEND GALLAGHER MASS

City Officials and Night Life Figures at Services for Cabaret Owner

Many figures prominent in the city’s night life during the last four decades gathered in St. Malachy’s Church on West Forty-ninth Street today at a requiem high mass for William J. Gallagher.

Mr. Gallagher was for fifteen years proprietor of the underground cabaret at 711 Seventh Avenue, near Forty-seventh Street, and had been a cabaret proprietor for more than forty years.  He died Sunday in the Medical Arts Sanitarium.

Joseph White, who, at the age of eighteen, got his first chance in the show business from Mr. Gallagher, sang two offerings at today’s mass.

“It was Billy’s last wish that I sing here,” Mr. White said afterward.  Mr. White is known as the masked tenor on the radio.

Prominent Men Attend

Among the prominent men at the mass were Michael J. Kennedy, City Marshal and leader of the Fifth Assembly District; Judge Owen Bohan; John J. McCann, former Alderman; Commissioner Charles Harnett of the Motor Vehicle Department; John J. Nevins, Deputy Register; Jay Finn, Deputy Chief Clerk of the Magistrates’ Court; Alderman John J. Mahoney; ex-State Senator Harry Doll, and General Sessions Judge George L. Donnelman.

Also present were “Laura,” the hat check girl in Mr. Gallagher’s establishment, and Jack Sheerin, the doorman there.

 

 

R.I.P. Billy Gallagher (1870-1934) – Part 2

This article appeared in an unknown newspaper – and I’m not sure how accurate the story about Billy giving away a million-dollar fortune … particularly when he just finalized a bankruptcy in 1930.

1934 03 05 Billy Gallagher DiesBILLY GALLAGHER, CAFE OWNER, DIES

Was Among the First to Bring Singing Waiters to Night Life Along Broadway

KNOWN AMONG THOUSANDS

Gave Away Bulk of a Reputed $1,000,000 Fortune to Aides and Former Patrons.

William J. Gallagher, cabaret proprietor for more than forty years, died yesterday of diabetes and gland poisoning, at the age of 65.

He was known affectionately as “Little Billy” among thousands of business men, politicians, judges, theatrical men, and devotees of the city’s night life.  For the last fifteen years he could be found in his underground cabaret at 711 Seventh Avenue, near Forth-seventh Street, which did not open until after sundown.

As other entertainment places, restaurants and speakeasies closed after midnight, business picked up at Billy Gallagher’s cabaret, until at dawn it was astir with reputable people still celebrating, and others who had practical reasons for circulating after dark.

Buckner Padlocked Place.

He managed to keep order, with only a few notable exceptions.  One of these was just before the prohibition era when a policeman in plain clothes shot up the place and put a bullet through the leg of the manager in a rage over prices.  When Emory Buckner, as United States Attorney, devised padlock proceedings in 1925 Gallagher was one of the first victims.  His place was raided occasionally for the possession of liquor during prohibition.

He was said to have had at least $1,000,000 and to have given most of it away to those who had worked for him as entertainers or had spent their money in his establishment when they had plenty and who came back to him when they were down in their luck to make a touch.  He was remembered along Broadway as the man who couldn’t say no to a hard-luck story.

Mr. Gallagher came to New York at the age of eighteen from Camden, N. J., where he was born.  He devoted his life to the cabaret business, providing food, drink and entertainment in spots which followed the centre of night life along Broadway as it moved uptown.

Encouraged New Talent.

1934 03 05 Billy Gallagher Dies (2)He was one of the earliest to introduce singing waiters uptown after they had become popular on the Bowery.  His floor shows gave the first chance for a public appearance to many younger entertainers who later succeeded on the vaudeville or legitimate stage.

When he was taken ill about six weeks ago, and when the word went out that Billy Gallagher needed a blood transfusion, many of his Broadway friends volunteered.  One of the first, Jack Sheerin, doorman of the cabaret for many years, was accepted.

Mr. Gallagher died in the Medical Arts Sanitarium, 57 West Fifty-seventh Street, after the last rites of the Roman Catholic Church had been administered by the Rev. Edward Leonard, pastor of St. Malachy’s, the actor’s church in West Forty-ninth Street.  At his bedside were his sons, Bernard, Joseph and Walter, who is a police lieutenant in Ridgefield, N. J., and his brother Joseph.  His wife died eight years ago.

The body was sent to his home, 34-51 Seventy-fifth Street, Jackson Heights, Queens, where it will remain until Wednesday.  After funeral services at St. Malachy’s Church, burial will take place in Camden, N. J.

 

R.I.P. Billy Gallagher (1870-1934) – Part 1

As we know, Billy Gallagher was somewhat of a celebrity.  His passing and his funeral made the news for a while.  Over the next several posts, I will share all the articles from Pop’s scrapbook and even others I found on my own.  

 

1934 03 05 - Billy Gallagher diesGALLAGHER, OLD RESTAURATEUR, PASSES AT 65

Resort in Seventh Ave. Famed Among Sporting Men, Politicians and Stage Players

Billy Gallagher, who ran what sportsmen called the luckiest restaurant in town, died of diabetes in Medical Arts Sanitarium yesterday.  Three operations and blood transfusions failed.  He was 65 and had been ill six weeks.

Gallagher’s place at 711 7th ave. gained fame among gamblers for the combination of numbers that spell success to crapshooters.

KNEW POLITICIANS.

But he included among his friends politicians of the importance of James J. Walker and Frank Hague and hundreds of theatrical folk.

He had been a restaurateur since boyhood, graduating from the Bowery to Broadway and bringing singing waiters uptown with him.

SOME GAINED FAME.

Some of them developed into vaudeville stars.  Others found fame among the songsters of Tin Pan Alley.

He leaves two sons — Walter, a Ridgewood, N. J., police lieutenant, and Joseph.  Their mother died eight years ago.

Gallagher lived at 34-51 75th st., Jackson Heights.  Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning in St. Malachy’s Church, 49th st.  Burial will be in Camden.

The following is from a separate article of unknown origin

Blood which Broadway pals opened their veins to share with him failed to save the life of Little Billy Gallagher, for 1934 03 05 - Billy Gallagher dies (2)forty years a boniface and the man who brought singing waiters from the Bowery to Broadway many years ago.

Gallagher died yesterday morning in the Medical Arts Sanitorium, where he had been confined for six weeks a victim of diabetes and a glandular condition which had necessitated three operations and many blood transfusions.

Gallagher, a friend of those out of luck and an intimate of scores of the great in the theatre and sporting world, ran Billy Gallagher’s restaurant at 711 Seventh Ave.  The place was once called the Broadway Gardens.  He was only 5 feet 5 inches tall, hence the name of Little Billy.

The funeral is tentatively planned for Wednesday.

 

Prospector Runs Afoul of New York Gold Diggers

As far as I can determine, this article is from around 1932 – a year after the start of construction of the Boulder (Hoover) Dam mentioned in the article.

1931-1935 Prospector Runs Afoul of NY Gold Diggers

Prospector, 63, Runs Afoul Of New York Gold Diggers, So He’ll Go Back To The Klondike To Dig Some More

Tired Of Movies, And Bright Lights, He’ll Try For Fortune

John Swanson, known wherever gold mining is a business, is developing a bad case of “itchy feet” and with his face turned toward the North is preparing to return soon to the land of the midnight sun.

Friend of Rex Beach and Jack London, and for many years companion of the late Tex Rickard, Swanson is now visiting at the home of Sergeant and Mrs. Walter Gallagher, Virgil Avenue, Ridgefield.  Despite his 63 years, he’s still young enough to dig another fortune out of the earth, and he is tarrying here just long enough to “rustle up” another grubstake to carry him to the north.

The “Old Prospector’s” next objective is Shandalora, Alaska, 135 miles north of the Arctic Circle and farther north than any mining camp has ever been staked out.  And in his decidedly Swedish dialect Swanson will tell you that in two years he will come out of Alaska with enough gold to keep him in comfort for the remainder of his life.  This despite the fact that he has lost more than one fortune to the “gold diggers” who make a business of relieving miners of their gold with a fountain pen and “phoney” [sic] contracts and the other variety who infest Broadway.

Starting with the Klondike rush in Dawson, Alaska in ’98 Swanson has dug and panned pay dirt in camps all through the Northland, in San Gabriel Valley, just outside of Hollywood, Arizona and Reno, Nev.

It was from Reno that he left for the East only several weeks ago.  Swanson tells stirring tales of his days in San Gabriel Valley, which he left little more than a year ago when the government ejected him and thousands of other miners to begin work on Boulder Dam.

Just about the time he was getting ready to leave, movie directors were scurrying over the countryside searching for a cast for “The Trail of ’98” and the old miner because of his intimate knowledge of the Klondike rush which the picture portrayed, was drafted to drive a dog sled.  Although having only a minor role, Swanson’s knowledge of details proved invaluable and when Russell Simpson, cast as the “Old Swede”, was taken sick, Swanson doubled for the actor at $50 a day.

Coming East, the miner lost no time in searching for his old friend William Sulzer, ex-Governor of New York, who has backed him on several expeditions.  Arriving here Swanson was keenly disappointed when he learned that he had possibly missed Sulzer by several days at Seattle, Wash., from which point the former Governor had left for his own mines in the North.

Asked whether if he made another “strike” he would return to his beloved Broadway which he left as a youth, Swanson replied: “I don’t tank so – this depression, dey don’t know nothing about sach things up North, so I guess maybe I go back and stay there.” But his friends know “Yon” and they doubt it.

 

Incidentally, I also checked the story about Swanson being in “The Trail of ’98,” and while I can’t confirm that he actually was in the movie or that he doubled for Russell Simpson, I did confirm that Russell Simpson played the “Old Swede” in the movie, but that all of his scenes were deleted.  Not sure what that says about Swanson’s acting …

Old Swede

Man Seriously Hurt in Brawl

I think this article is from between 1931 and 1935, while Pop was still a Sergeant. Unfortunately, I was unable to narrow it further using the information on the individuals in the article.

1931-1935 Man Seriously Hurt in Brawl - no date Franino Crattey Kelly

Man Seriously Hurt in Brawl

Three Freight Jumpers Held After Fight in Ridgefield

One man is in Hackensack Hospital in a critical condition with a fractured skull, his alleged assailant was arrested and two men held as material witnesses as the result of a brawl in the Ridgefield yards of the New York Ontario & Western Railroad, at 2:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon.

Angelo Franino, 36, of 17 Murphy street, Newton, Mass., was struck on the head with an iron bar and brutally beaten.  James Crattey, alias Patrick Kelley, 50, of Roseland, Mass., is in the Ridgefield jail charged with atrocious assault and battery.  The witnesses, Richard Conors, 41, of Brighton, Mass, and William Donovan of Boston, are being detained in the Fort Lee jail.

The Ridgefield Park police received a tip of a disturbance at the place and upon learning its location notified the Ridgefield police.  Sergeant Walter Gallagher arrived at the scene and made the arrests single-handed.  Gallagher also summoned the hospital ambulance.

Gallagher said the men were riding freight cars and were temporarily stranded in Ridgefield waiting for another train.  While there Franino told his companions his money was stolen, accusing Crattey.  A general fight resulted during which Connors was struck in the face and lacerated.

Crattey was taken to Hackensack for questioning by the prosecutor’s detectives.  After a charge was made against him there he was returned to the Ridgefield jail.

Prosecutor’s Detective John Gallione was stationed at Franino’s bedside to obtain a statement from him.

 

Four Suspects Nabbed by Cop

This article is from October 1931.  Newspaper unknown.

1931 10 Four Suspects Nabbed by CopFour Suspects Nabbed by Cop

One Picked As Holdup Bandit — 3 in Jail for Investigation

Nabbed as they are alleged to have been attempting to break into a Ridgefield filling station, three New York City men have been committed to jail until their police records can be investigated, and a fourth has been partially identified as a participant in a recent $30 Hackensack store holdup.

The arrest, made early Wednesday morning by Patrolman Paul, of Ridgefield, was disclosed last night when Recorder Harry F. Baker, of that borough, sentenced three of the quartet to 10 days in the Bergen County jail on charges of acting as disorderly persons.

The fourth, who identified himself as Mario Bilello, 20, of 75th street, Ozone Park, Queens, was picked out of a police lineup by a delivery boy employed by the American Stores Co.  Inasmuch as the youth was not certain of the prisoner, the clerk and an assistant will view the suspect today to effect positive identification before Bilello is charged with the robbery.

Police Records Found

The three taken to jail at Hackensack last night gave their identity as Michael Spinelli, 21, of 155 East 110th street; Joseph Guardino, 23, of 147 Elizabeth street, and Charles Bruno, 24, or 238 East 30th street, all Manhattan.

Unable to account for their presence at Quinn’s gasoline station, Broad avenue and Marion place, at 2 o’clock Wednesday morning, the four men were held overnight in Ridgefield cells.  Their photographs, fingerprints, Bertillon measurements and other identification were sent to the New York City police, where it was learned Guardino was arrested in 1928 for robbery, and Bilello was held once before that for grand larceny.

Although partially identified as having participated in the $30 Hackensack robbery October 28 last, the four men have not been definitely connected with other Bergen County holdups committed in the past four months.  None of them is believed to have participated in two recent Palisades Park and Ridgefield offenses of this sort.

———————————-

About the Criminals:

Joseph Guardino can be found on the 1920 U.S. census at age 11 living with his Italian immigrant parents, Frank and Jennie, at 143 Broome Street in Manhattan.  He appears to be an only child, but his parents are aged 60 and 46, so there may be older siblings who no longer live in the household.  In 1930, he is found with his mother, now a widow, and a brother Vincent, who is 2 years older than Joseph, and who I am fairly certain was called “Vinnie.”  One has to wonder where his brother was living during the last enumeration.  In 1940, Joseph is married to Gussie and has 4 children – 3 sons and a daughter.  Under occupation, he is listed as a “new worker,” though he is 33 years old and claims to have been living in the same house in 1935.  I was able to locate Vinnie in 1920 at the New York Catholic Protectory, a home for destitute children and juvenile delinquents that was in operation from 1865 until 1938.  It was located in the area now known as the Parkchester housing development in the Bronx.  Apparently, the whole family led a life of crime.

I was unable to locate any positive information on Mario Bilello, Michael Spinelli, or Charles Bruno.

 

14 Jersey Victims of Noble Experiment

I’m not sure what newspaper this was from or when it was actually published, just that it was after October 1930.  I have no idea why Pop would have saved this article, but it’s in his scrapbook, so I’m including it here.  Additional information found on the individuals mentioned in this article is provided in brackets.

1931 01 - List of 14 Jersey Victims of Noble Experiment

List of Fourteen Jersey Victims of Noble Experiment

Fourteen men have been put on the spot in the gang wars between hijackers and rum-runners in Bergen and Passaic counties.  The list of the “martyrs” follows:

Jan. 22, 1927 — Marry [sic Harry] (Schwabbles) Joachim, hijacker, slain in Lincoln inn, Paterson.  Michael Spinella sought as murderer.  [Harry’s brother was also wounded in the attack.  Spinella was the proprietor of the Lincoln Inn.  This Spinella may be the future crime boss who was later deported back to Italy, but snuck back into the U.S. through Florida and continued his criminal activities. He died in 1971. You can read more about his deportation and re-entry here.  He was acquitted of the Joachim murder in February 1934.]

The Brookly Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 22 Jan 1927, p 22 col 6; courtesy Newspapers.com
The Brookly Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 22 Jan 1927, p 22 col 6; courtesy Newspapers.com

Nov. 15, 1927 — Thomas Di Floramo, hijacker, slain in a field near Totowa section of Paterson.

April 28, 1928 — Big Frank Logioco, owner of Ye Olde Time inn, Garfield, slain in pistol battle with hijackers.  [This story made news as far away as Havre, Montana and El Paso, Texas; see article below]

April 28, 1928 — Arthur (Yigi) Huff, gunman, slain in raid on Ye Olde Time inn. [Likely the “tough guy” referenced in the article below]

The Havre Daily News (Havre, Montana), 30 Apr 1928, p. 1, col. 6 (courtesy of Newspapers.com)
The Havre Daily News (Havre, Montana), 30 Apr 1928, p. 1, col. 6 (courtesy of Newspapers.com)

May 21, 1928 — Alexander (Schmutzy) Szabo, beer runner, slain by hijackers in Passaic garage.  [Szabo gave a deathbed statement identifying the four “hoodlums” who attacked him as payback for stealing their ale burner.  James (Cockeye) O’Leary, the only surviving assailant, would not be convicted until 1957.]

The Times-News (Hendersonville, NC) 21 Mar 1957 p 11 col 4, courtesy Google News
The Times-News (Hendersonville, NC) 21 Mar 1957 p 11 col 4, courtesy Google News

March 17, 1930 — Milton (Doll) Green, hijacker, slain in Paterson apartment by associates.  [Apparent suicide determined to be murder. See article below]

The New York Sun, 18 Mar 1930, p 4 col 3-4; courtesy FultonHistory.com
The New York Sun, 18 Mar 1930, p 4 col 3-4; courtesy FultonHistory.com

April 12, 1930 — Archie Senville, hijacker, slain by beer runners and body taken to Newark.  [Former pugilist (“the bearded wonder”) turned gangster gunned down while driving his car.  He survived three other attempts on his life].

The Lockport Union Sun & Journal (Lockport, NY), 11 Apr 1930, p 16 col 3
The Lockport Union Sun & Journal (Lockport, NY), 11 Apr 1930, p 16 col 3 (courtesy Newspapers.com)

 

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 2 Jul 1929, p 19 col 6 (courtesy Newspapers.com)

April 27, 1930 — Michael (Big Mike) Redding, beer runner, slain by hijackers.

May 30, 1930 — Anthony (Sparky) Wilda, hijacker, slain by beer men in Passaic.  Body taken to Paramus.

May 30, 1930 — William (Wild Bill) Schlessinger, same fate as Wilda.

June 1, 1930 — Frank Lovulla, beer runner, dies of wounds inflicted by hijackers.

[Wilda and Schlessinger apparently shot Lovulla and left him for dead. Lovulla’s friends then apparently tortured and killed Wilda and Schlessinger.  Lovulla was a former partner of “Big Frank” Logioco killed earlier (see above)]

The Brookly Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 31 May 1930 p 3 col 1, courtesy Newspapers.com
The Brookly Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 31 May 1930 p 3 col 1, courtesy Newspapers.com

Aug. 3, 1930 — Peter Curapolo, beer runner, slain in Garfield.  [Gunned down on his porch in front of his wife]

The Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, PA), 4 Aug 1930, p 3 col 3; courtesy Newspapers.com
The Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, PA), 4 Aug 1930, p 3 col 3; courtesy Newspapers.com

Oct. 16, 1930 — Morris (Mushy) Friedman, hijacker, slain in Paterson by beer men. [John “Johnny King” Yerzy and Morris “Fat” Berliner, went to Mushy’s home and chased him for several blocks before riddling him with bullets.  They justified it by claiming they had warned him to stop hijacking his beer trucks.  I don’t know whether Berliner was ever captured and/or convicted.]

The Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, PA), 17 Oct 1930, p 21 col 6; courtesy Newspapers.com
The Harrisburg Telegraph (Harrisburg, PA), 17 Oct 1930, p 21 col 6; courtesy Newspapers.com
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 18 Oct 1930, p 1 col 3; courtesy Newspapers.com
The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Brooklyn, NY), 18 Oct 1930, p 1 col 3; courtesy Newspapers.com